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Heidi was born in Texas, and in an attempt to reside in as many cities in that state as she could, made it to Houston, Lubbock, Austin, and El Paso. After spending a decade in Southern California, she now lives in Eastern Washington state with her husband, their two cats, her laptop, and her e-reader. Being from the South, she often contemplates the magic of snow.

Heidi was born in Texas, and in an attempt to reside in as many cities in that state as she could, made it to Houston, Lubbock, Austin, and El Paso. After spending a decade in Southern California, she now lives in Eastern Washington state with her husband, their two cats, her laptop, and her e-reader. Being from the South, she often contemplates the magic of snow.

Beauty and the Beast (Reconstructed from various European sources by Joseph Jacobs). Link to Beauty and the Beast (France, Jeanne-Marie LePrince de Beaumont). This is the classic version of the story, first published in 1757. Link to The Story of the Beauty and the Beast (France, Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve - as translated by J. R. Planch in Four and Twenty Fairy Tales: Selected from Those of Perrault and Other Popular Writers [London: G. Routledge and Company, 1858], pp. ). Link to Beauty and the Beast (France, Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve - as abridged and retold by Andrew Lang in The Blue Fairy Book, 5th edition [London: Longmans, Green, and Company, 1891], pp. ). The Small-Tooth Dog (England, Sidney Oldall Addy). Rose (Irish-American). The Summer and Winter Garden (Germany, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm). Link to The Singing, Springing Lark (Germany, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm). The Clinking Clanking Lowesleaf (Germany, Carl and Theodor Colshorn). The Little Nut Twig (Germany, Ludwig Bechstein). Little Broomstick (Germany, Ludwig Bechstein). Link to The Enchanted Frog (Germany, Carl and Theodor Colshorn). Beauty and the Horse (Denmark, J. Christian Bay). The Singing Rose (Austria, Ignaz and Joseph Zingerle). The Bear Prince (Switzerland, Otto Sutermeister). Beauty and the Beast (Basque). Zelinda and the Monster (Italy, Thomas Frederick Crane). The Snake-Prince (Greece, Lucy M. J. Garnett). The Enchanted Tsarvich (Russia, Alexander Afanasyev). The Fairy Serpent (China, Adele M. Fielde). Links to related sites. Additional tales. External sites. Return to D. L. Ashliman`s folktexts, a library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology. Beauty and the Beast Joseph Jacobs There was once a merchant that had three daughters, and he loved them better than himself. Now it happened that he had to go a long journey to buy some goods, and when he was just starting he said to them, And the eldest daughter asked to have a necklace; and the second daughter wished to have a gold chain; but the youngest daughter said, said her father, she said, Well, the merchant went on his journey and did his business and bought a pearl necklace for his eldest daughter, and a gold chain for his second daughter; but he knew it was no use getting a rose for the youngest while he was so far away because it would fade before he got home. So he made up his mind he would get a rose for her the day he got near his house. When all his merchanting was done he rode off home and forgot all about the rose till he was near his house; then he suddenly remembered what he had promised his youngest daughter, and looked about to see if he could find a rose. Near where he had stopped he saw a great garden, and getting off his horse he wandered about in it till he found a lovely rosebush; and he plucked the most beautiful rose he could see on it. At that moment he heard a crash like thunder, and looking around he saw a huge monster - two tusks in his mouth and fiery eyes surrounded by bristles, and horns coming out of its head and spreading over its back. said the beast, said the merchant in fear and terror for his life, said the beast, The merchant fell on his knees and begged for his life for the sake of his three daughters who had none but him to support them. said the beast, So the merchant swore, and taking his rose mounted his horse and rode home. As soon as he got into his house his daughters came rushing round him, clapping their hands and showing their joy in every way, and soon he gave the necklace to his eldest daughter, the chain to his second daughter, and then he gave the rose to his youngest, and as he gave it he sighed. they all cried. But the youngest said, said the merchant. So for several days they lived happily together, though the merchant wandered about gloomy and sad, and nothing his daughters could do would cheer him up till at last he took his youngest daughter aside and said to her, ; and then he told her of all that had occurred with the beast when he got the rose for her. Bella was very sad, as you can well think, and then she said, So next day the merchant took Bella behind him on his horse, as was the custom in those days, and rode off to the dwelling of the beast. And when he got there and they alighted from his horse the doors of the house opened, and what do you think they saw there! Nothing. So they went up the steps and went through the hall, and went into the dining room, and there they saw a table spread with all manner of beautiful glasses and plates and dishes and napery, with plenty to eat upon it. So they waited and they waited, thinking that the owner of the house would appear, till at last the merchant said, And when they sat down invisible hands passed them things to eat and to drink, and they ate and drank to their hearts Sons, 1916), Journal of American Folk-Lore, vol. 2, no. 6 (July - September, 1889), pp. 213-14. Newell`s source: Return to the table of contents. The Summer and Winter Garden Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm A merchant was planning to go to a fair, so he asked his three daughters what he should bring back for them. The oldest one said, The second, The third, To find a rose would be difficult, for it was the middle of winter, but because the youngest daughter was the most beautiful, and because she took great pleasure in flowers, the father said that he would do his best to find her one. The merchant was now on his homeward trip. He had a splendid dress for the oldest daughter, a pair of beautiful shoes for the second one, but he had not been able to get a rose for the third one. Whenever he had entered a garden looking for roses, the people just laughed at him, asking him if he believed that roses grew in the snow. He was very sad about this, and as he was thinking about what he might bring his dearest child, he came to a castle. It had an adjoining garden where it was half summer and half winter. On the one side the most beautiful flowers were blossoming - large and small. On the other side everything was bare and covered with deep snow. The man climbed from his horse. He was overjoyed to see an entire hedge full of roses on the summer side. He approached it, picked one of them, and then rode off. He had already ridden some distance when he heard something running and panting behind him. Turning around, he saw a large black beast, that called out, The man said, In order to get rid of the beast, the man said yes, thinking that he would not come to claim her. However, the beast shouted back to him, So the merchant brought each daughter what she had wanted, and each one was delighted, especially the youngest with her rose. Eight days later the three sisters were sitting together at the table when something came stepping heavily up the stairs to the door. it shouted. They opened the door, and were terrified when a large black beast stepped inside. With that he went to the youngest daughter and grabbed hold of her. She began to scream, but it did not help. She had to go away with him. And when the father came home, his dearest child had been taken away. The black beast carried the beautiful maiden to his castle where everything was beautiful and wonderful. Musicians were playing there, and below there was the garden, half summer and half winter, and the beast did everything to make her happy, fulfilling even her unspoken desires. They ate together, and she had to scoop up his food for him, for otherwise he would not have eaten. She was dear to the beast, and finally she grew very fond of him. One day she said to him, So the beast led her to a mirror and said, She looked into the mirror, and it was as though she were at home. She saw her living room and her father. He really was sick, from a broken heart, because he held himself guilty that his dearest child had been taken away by a wild beast and surely had been eaten up. If he could know how well off she was, then he would not be so sad. She also saw her two sisters sitting on the bed and crying. Her heart was heavy because of all this, and she asked the beast to allow her to go home for a few days. The beast refused for a long time, but she grieved so much that he finally had pity on her and said, She promised, and as she was leaving, he called out again, When she arrived home her father was overjoyed to see her once again, but sickness and grief had already eaten away at his heart so much that he could not regain his health, and within a few days he died. Because of her sadness, she could think of nothing else. Her father was buried, and she went to the funeral. The sisters cried together, and consoled one another, and when her thoughts finally turned to her dear beast, the eight days were long past. She became frightened, and it seemed to her that he too was sick. She set forth immediately and returned to his castle. When she arrived there everything was still and sad inside. The musicians were not playing. Black cloth hung everywhere. The garden was entirely in winter and covered with snow. She looked for the beast, but he was not there. She looked everywhere, but could not find him. Then she was doubly sad, and did not know how to console herself. She sadly went into the garden where she saw a pile of cabbage heads. They were old and rotten, and she pushed them aside. After turning over a few of them she saw her dear beast. He was lying beneath them and was dead. She quickly fetched some water and poured it over him without stopping. Then he jumped up and was instantly transformed into a handsome prince. They got married, and the musicians began to play again, and the summer side of the garden appeared in its splendor, and the black cloth was all ripped down, and together they lived happily ever after. Source: Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, 1998 was replaced in the Grimms The Singing, Springing Lark. Return to the table of contents. The Clinking Clanking Lowesleaf Germany Once upon a time there was a king who had three daughters. The youngest was his pride and joy. One day he wanted to go to the fair to buy something, and he asked his three daughters what he should bring home for them. The first one asked for a golden spinning wheel. The second one a golden yarn reel, and the third one a clinking clanking lowesleaf. The king promised to bring these things and rode away. At the fair he bought the golden spinning wheel and the golden yarn reel, but no one had a clinking clanking lowesleaf for sale. He looked everywhere, but could not find one. This saddened him, because the youngest daughter was the joy of his life, and he wanted to please her ever so much. As he sorrowfully made his way homeward, he came to a great, great forest and to a large birch tree. Under the birch tree there lay a large black poodle dog. Because the king looked so sad, the dog asked him what was the matter. answered the king, said the poodle. At first the king did not want to agree, but he thought about it long and hard, then said to himself, And he made the promise. The poodle wagged his tail, climbed up into the birch, broke off the leaf with his frizzy-haired paw, and gave it to the king, saying, The king repeated his promise, took the leaf, and rode on joyfully. As he approached home, his youngest daughter jumped out with joy to greet him. The king was horrified. His heart was so filled with grief that he pushed her aside. She started to cry, thinking, and she went inside and complained to her mother. Soon the king came in. He gave the oldest girl the golden spinning wheel, the middle one the golden yarn reel, and the youngest one the clinking clanking lowesleaf, and he was quiet and sad. Then the queen asked him was wrong with him, and why he had pushed the youngest daughter away; but he said nothing. He grieved the entire year. He lamented and mourned and became thin and pale, so concerned was he. Whenever the queen asked him what was wrong, he only shook his head or walked away. Finally, when the year was nearly at its end, he could not longer keep still, and he told her about his misfortune, and thought that his wife would die of shock. She too was horrified, but she soon took hold of herself and said, The day arrived, and they dressed up the goose girl in their youngest daughterll take you away! He ran much more gently this time, and did not stop in the great forest under the birch tree, but hurried deeper and deeper into the woods until they finally reached a small house, where he quietly lay the princess, who had fallen asleep, onto a soft bed. She slumbered on and dreamed about her parents, and about the strange ride, and she laughed and cried in her sleep. The poodle lay down in his hut and kept watch over the little house and the princess. When she awoke the next morning and found herself soul alone, she cried and grieved and wanted to run away, but she could not, because the house was enchanted. It let people enter, but no one could leave. There was plenty there to eat and drink, everything that even a princess could desire, but she did not want anything and did not take a single bite. She could neither see nor hear the poodle, but the birds sang wonderfully. There were deer grazing around and about, and they looked at the princess with their large eyes. The morning wind curled her golden locks and poured fresh color over her face. The princess sighed and said, screeched a harsh voice close behind her, startling the princess. She looked around, and there stood a bleary-eyed woman as old as the hills. She glared at the princess and said, The princess took very careful notice of everything, and the old woman disappeared. The first night the prince asked and begged her to open her door, but she answered, and she did not do it. The second night he asked her even more sweetly, but she did not answer at all. She buried her head in her pillow, and she did not open the door. The third night he asked her so touchingly and sang such beautiful melodies to her, that she wanted to jump up and open the door for him, but fortunately she remembered the old woman and her mother and father. She pulled the bedcovers over her head, and did not open the door. Complaining, the prince walked away, but she did not hear him leave. While he slept she built up the fire, crept out on tiptoe, picked up the rough hide from the corner where the poodle always put it, barred the bedroom door, and threw it into the flames. The poodle jumped up howling, gnawed and clawed at the door, threatened, begged, growled, and howled again. But she did not open the door, and he could not open the door, however fiercely he threw himself against it. The fire flamed up brightly one last time, and there was an enormous bang, as if heaven and hell had exploded. Standing before her was the most handsome prince in the world. The hut was now a magnificent castle, the forest a great city full of palaces, and the animals were all kinds of people. At their wedding ceremony, the prince and the princess were seated at the table with the old king and the old queen and the two sisters and many rich and important people, when the bride called out three times, Old tongues, Old lungs! and the tattered old woman came in. The old queen scolded, and the two princesses scolded, and they wanted to chase her away, but the young queen stood up and let the old woman sit down at her place, eat from her plate, and drink from her goblet. When the old woman had eaten and drunk her fill, she looked at the old queen and the evil daughters, and they became crooked and lame. But she blessed the young queen, and she became seven times more beautiful, and no one ever saw or heard from the old woman again. Source: Carl and Theodor Colshorn, Mrchen und Sagen aus Hannover (Hannover: Verlag von Carl Ruempler, 1854), no. 20, pp. 64-69. Translated by D. L. Ashliman. 1998. Return to the table of contents. The Little Nut Twig Germany Once upon a time there was a rich merchant whose business required him to travel abroad. Taking leave, he said to his three daughters, The oldest one said, The second one said, The youngest one cuddled up to her father and whispered, said the merchant, The merchant traveled far and purchased many goods, but he also faithfully remembered his daughterss most widely read collector and editor of folktales during the nineteenth century, his popularity within Germany at that time surpassing that of his more scholarly contemporaries, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Return to the table of contents. Little Broomstick Germany There was once a merchant who had three daughters. The two older ones were proud and haughty. The younger one, however, was well behaved and modest, although her beauty greatly surpassed that of her sisters. She dressed simply, and thus unconsciously enhanced her beauty more than her sisters were able to do with the most expensive clothing and jewelry. Nettchen, that was the name of the merchantschen Buchhandlung, 1852), no. 30, pp. 183-88. Translated by D. L. Ashliman. 1998. Return to the table of contents. The Bear Prince Switzerland A merchant once wanted to go to market. He asked his three daughters what he should bring home for them. The oldest one said, said the middle one. But the youngest one said, Once at the market, the merchant saw as many pearls and precious stones as he could possibly want. And he soon purchased a sky-blue dress as well. But as for a grape, he could not find one anywhere at the market. This saddened him greatly, because he loved his youngest daughter most of all. Buried thus in his thoughts, he was making his way toward home when a little dwarf stepped before him. He asked, answered the merchant, The dwarf said, So the merchant went down into the meadow, and it happened just as the dwarf had said. A white bear was keeping guard at the vineyard, and he growled at the merchant when he was still a long way off. said the merchant, said the bear, The merchant did not think long about this before accepting the bears she told him all about her life in the castle. Afterward, when she was taking leave from him, he secretly gave her some matches that the bear was not supposed to see. But the bear did see them, and he growled angrily, Then he took his wife back to the castle, and they lived there together as before. Some time later the bear said, she said, said the bear. She did it once again, and everything happened as the first time. But when she visited her father the third time, the bear failed to see that her father secretly gave her some matches. After arriving back at the castle, she could hardly wait for night to come when the bear was sleeping next to her in bed. Silently she struck a light and was startled with amazement and joy, for next to her was lying a handsome youth with a golden crown on his head. He smiled at her and said, With that the entire castle came alive. Servants and attendants came from all sides, wishing good luck to the king and the queen. Source: Otto Sutermeister, Kinder- und Hausmrchen aus der Schweiz (Aarau: H. R. Sauerlnder, 1873), no. 37, pp. 112-15. Translated by D. L. Ashliman. 1998. Return to the table of contents. Beauty and the Beast Basque As there are many in the world in its state now, there was a king who had three daughters. He used continually to bring handsome presents to his two elder daughters, but did not pay any attention at all to his youngest daughter, and yet she was the prettiest and most amiable. The king kept going from fair to fair, and from feast to feast, and from everywhere he used to bring something for the two eldest daughters. One day, when he was going to a feast, he said to his youngest daughter, She said to her father, He goes off, and is busy buying and buying; for one a hat, for the other a beautiful piece of stuff for a dress, and for the first again a shawl; and he was returning home, when in passing before a beautiful castle, he sees a garden quite full of flowers, and he says to himself, He takes some then, and as soon, as he has done so, a voice says to him, The king goes off home. He gives his elder daughters their presents, and her nosegay to the youngest. She thanks her father. After a certain time this king became sad. His eldest daughter said to him, He says to her, His eldest daughter answers him, The second also asks him, He told her how he is bound to send one of his daughters to such a place before the end of the year, otherwise he should be burned. This one too says to him, The youngest, after some days, said to him, He said to her, This daughter said to him, And she sets out immediately in a carriage. She arrives at the castle and goes in, and she hears music and sounds of rejoicing everywhere, and yet she did not see anyone. She finds her chocolate ready (in the morning), and her dinner the same. She goes to bed, and still she does not see anyone. The next morning a voice says to her, There appears then an enormous serpent. Without intending it, the young lady could not help giving a little shudder. An instant after the serpent went away; and the young lady lived very happily, without lacking anything. One day the voice asked her if she did not wish to go home. She answers, He gives her a ring, and says to her, The young lady sets out for her fathers source: Estefanella Hirigaray. Return to the table of contents. Zelinda and the Monster Italy There was once a poor man who had three daughters; and as the youngest was the fairest and most civil, and had the best disposition, her other two sisters envied her with a deadly envy, although her father, on the contrary, loved her dearly. It happened that in a neighboring town, in the month of January, there was a great fair, and that poor man was obliged to go there to lay in the provisions necessary for the support of his family; and before departing he asked his three daughters if they would like some small presents in proportion, you understand, to his means. Rosina wished a dress, Marietta asked him for a shawl, but Zelinda was satisfied with a handsome rose. The poor man set out on his journey early the next day, and when he arrived at the fair quickly bought what he needed, and afterward easily found Rosinas power. When the monster was alone with Zelinda he began to caress her, and make loving speeches to her, and managed to appear quite civil. There was no danger of his forgetting her, and he saw that she wanted nothing, and every day, talking with her in the garden, he asked her, The young girl always answered him in the same way, Then the monster appeared very sorrowful, and redoubled his caresses and attentions, and, sighing deeply, said, Zelinda, although in her heart not dissatisfied with that beautiful place and with being treated like a queen, still did not feel at all like marrying the monster, because he was too ugly and looked like a beast, and always answered his requests in the same manner. One day, however, the monster called Zelinda in haste, and said, And, drawing out an enchanted mirror, the monster showed Zelinda her father on his deathbed. At that spectacle Zelinda, in despair and half mad with grief, cried, Scarcely had Zelinda uttered these words when suddenly the monster was transformed into a very handsome youth. Zelinda was astounded by this unexpected change, and the young man took her by the hand, and said, Source: Thomas Frederick Crane, Italian Popular Tales (London: Macmillan and Company, 1885), no. 2, pp. 7-11. Return to the table of contents. The Snake-Prince Greece Scarlet thread, spun on the wheel, Twisting on the twirling reel, Like the dancers turn and spin, While I now my tale begin! Once upon a time there was a merchant, and he traded as the saying is. He had twelve ships which sailed to foreign countries, and he had besides three pretty daughters. Well, as time went on, luck turned against the merchant. His wife died; one by one he lost his ships; and every year he became poorer and poorer. At last he had lost all his property with the exception of one farm, and he went to live there with his daughters. As they had now no money to hire laborers, the merchant told the girls that they must set to and work on the farm in order that they might gain a living. replied the two eldest, tossing their heads. But the youngest, whose name was Rosa, loved her father very dearly; and she at once prepared to do as he wished. So she set to with a will, and digged in the garden, and raked, and planted; and when the fruits and vegetables were grown, she rose early in the morning to gather them for her father to carry to market. Time passed, and after many months tidings came to the merchant that three of his belated ships had come into port laden with costly goods, when he immediately prepared to go to the city. But before mounting his horse, he asked his daughters what each desired as a present. The two eldest begged for fine silken gowns; but when he asked the youngest, she said, And when her father pressed her, she said, So the merchant set off for the port, and landed his goods. In twelve dayss skin fell off him, and he became a handsome prince. And the table again opened and all the world was seen therein. Then Rosa asked him what manner of man he was, and how he had become a snake. And he told her how that he had fallen under the spell of an enchantress who had changed him into a snake, and had doomed him to retain that shape until he should find a maiden who would consent to marry him. he said, So they were married, and the prince made his father-in-law his grand vizier. And we will leave them well, and return and find them better - God be praised! Source: Lucy M. J. Garnett, Greek Wonder Tales (London: Adam and Charles Black, 1913), , no. 11, pp. 180-88. Return to the table of contents. The Enchanted Tsarvich Russia Once upon a time there was a merchant who had three daughters. It so happened he had one day to go to strange countries to buy wares, and so he asked his daughters, The eldest asked for a new coat, and the next one also asked for a new coat; but the youngest one only took a sheet of paper and sketched a flower on it. So the merchant went and made a long journey to foreign kingdoms, but he could never see such a flower. So he came back home, and he saw on his way a splendid lofty palace with watchtowers, turrets, and a garden. He went a walk in the garden, and you cannot imagine how many trees he saw and flowers, every flower fairer than the other flowers. And then he looked and he saw a single one like the one which his daughter had sketched. he said, So he ran up and broke it off, and as soon as he had done it, in that very instant a boisterous wind arose and thunder thundered, and a fearful monster stood in front of him, a formless, winged snake with three heads. cried the snake to the merchant. The merchant was frightened, fell on his knees and besought pardon. said the snake, The merchant agreed to the condition and came back home. And the youngest daughter saw him from the window and ran out to meet him. Then the merchant hung his head, looked at his beloved daughter, and began to shed bitter tears. He gave her the blossom and told what had befallen him. said the youngest daughter. So the father took her away, set her in the palace, bade farewell, and set out home. Then the fair maiden, the daughter of the merchant, went in the different rooms, and beheld everywhere gold and velvet; but no one was there to be seen, not a single human soul. Time went by and went by, and the fair damsel became hungry and thought, But before ever she had thought, in front of her stood a table, and on the table were dishes and drinks and refreshments. The only thing that was not there was birds source is the great collection of Alexander Afanasyev (). Return to the table of contents. The Fairy Serpent China Once there was a man who had three daughters, of whom he was devotedly fond. They were skilful in embroidery; and he used every day on his way home from work to gather some flowers for them to use as patterns. One day when he found no flowers along his route homeward he went into the woods to look for wild blossoms, and he unwittingly invaded the domain of a fairy serpent, that coiled around him, held him tightly, and railed at him for having entered his garden. The man excused himself, saying that he came merely to get a few flowers for his daughters, who would be sorely disappointed were he to go home without his usual gift to them. The snake asked him the number, the names, and the ages of his daughters, and then refused to let him go unless he promised one of them in marriage to him. The poor man tried every argument he could think of to induce the snake to release him upon easier terms, but the reptile would accept no other ransom. At last the father, dreading greater evil to his daughters should they be deprived of his protection, gave the required promise and went home. He could eat no supper, however, for he knew the power of fairies to afflict those who offend them, and he was full of anxiety concerning the misfortunes that must overwhelm his whole family should the compact be disregarded. Some days passed; his daughters carefully prepared his meals, and affectionately besought him to eat them, but he would not come to the table. He was always plunged in sorrowful meditation. They conferred among themselves as to the cause of his uncommon behavior, and, having decided that one of them must have displeased him, they agreed to try to find out which one it might be, by going separately, each in turn, to urge him to eat. The eldest went, expressed her distress at his loss of appetite, and urged him to partake of food. He replied that he would do so if she would for his sake marry the snake to whom he had promised a wife. She bluntly refused to carry out her father`s contract, and left him in deeper trouble than before. The second daughter then went to beg him to take food, received the same reply, and likewise declined meeting the engagement he had made. The youngest daughter then went and entreated him to eat, heard his story, and at once declared that, if he would care for his own health properly, she would become the bride of the serpent. The father therefore took his meals again, the days sped without bringing calamity, and the welfare of the family for a time seemed secure. But one morning, as the girls were sitting at their embroidery, a wasp flew into the room and sangtable of contents. Revised February 16, 2016.

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